brunch with Sandor Katz

On September 28th, we had an intimate brunch with Sandor Katz that explored the incredible range of techniques and flavors of fermented foods from around the world! Each course was created by chef Geoff Lukas and presented one of the great fermenting regions and diners enjoyed foods both familiar and new. Read a recap of the brunch by Boston Ferments leader Kimi Ceridon here

 

As each course was presented, Sandor described the fermented dishes and spoke about the region and cultural / historical significance of the foods. Learn more about some of the more obscure fermented menu pieces here

 

when:       Sunday, September 28, 2014

where:      patio of Oleana Restaurant

 

dinner description

Fermentation is one of the oldest forms of food preservation, finding a place across all cultures and geographies. Classically, it allowed civilizations in colder climates to make the most of a short growing season and enabled those in hotter climates to withstand the rigors of the summer. Today, the practice of fermentation is being utilized as a way to promote flavor, complexity and nutrition in our food. From the range of Japanese vegetable ferments, to the dairy ferments of desert nomads and the domesticated mold used by Amazonian tribes, fermented foods appear in fascinating ways and often with surprising cross-cultural parallels. Learn more about the cultural & historical roots of the menu here

 

Menu

 

(Asia)
fermented congee porridge

kimchi-pickled egg

koji
drink: puehr tea

 

(the Americas)

fermented fish

corn

cultured butter

mole negro

cherokee fermented corn

sausage

drink: conserva cruda bloody Mary

 

(Africa)

Fermented bean 'pancake'

sunflower ugiri

sunflower petal marmalade

honey

drink: anise hyssop honey vinegar shrub 

 

(Middle East)

salshir

honey comb

fermented stone fruit

drink: dough, a lightly naturally carbonated yogurt drink

 

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Boston Ferments is proud to be sponsored by Indigo, a local Boston company which offers microbial seed treatments for corn, cotton, rice, soybeans, and wheat; and Ginkgo Bioworks, who design custom microbes for customers across multiple markets, developing new organisms that replace technology with biology.